News

Published on August 4th, 2014 | by admin

0

WW1: 100 Years To The Day The Lights Went Out

Declaration of War

Today marks 100 years since Britain declared war on Germany. On the evening of this day back in 1914, lamps went out across Europe and people all over the country are being encouraged to use a single candle or light for an hour from 10pm to 11pm tonight to mark the World War One centenary.

Lights Out

As the nation takes time to reflect and remember the immense bravery of the men and women who served their country in what was one of the most destructive conflicts ever fought, the British Legion’s ‘Lights Out’ event will also see the lights go out at many landmark buildings across the country with only a single candle or light burning.

Amongst the commemorative events taking place to mark this crucial date in the conflict, a candle-lit vigil service will be held at Westminster Abbey.

The ‘Lights Out’ themed event has been inspired by the words of wartime Foreign Secretary Sir Edward Grey. On the eve of World War One he had said: “The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our life-time.”

In another poignant mark of respect, 888,246 ceramic poppies are being placed in the dry moat at the Tower of London, one for each soldier who perished fighting for Britain and its colonies in WW1.

The Role of The GPO During World War 1

In another poignant mark of respect, 888,246 ceramic poppies are being placed in the dry moat at the Tower of London, one for each soldier who perished fighting for Britain and its colonies in WW1.

post_office_rifles_infographic_final_50percent (2)

12,000 men fought with the Post Office Rifles regiment which had existed since 1868. 1,800 brave soldiers perished in conflict and a further 4,500 were wounded in battle. The bravery of men within the regiment was encapsulated by Sgt Alfred Knight who was awarded the Victoria Cross.

The role of women in the workplace changed drastically during the war, notably at the General Post Office with many of the women back home filling full time positions that men had previously occupied. Before the war women who working in the Post Office had to leave their positions when they got married, but by November 1916 some 35,000 women were employed in temporary positions.

Working tirelessly to keep vital lines of communications open throughout the conflict, 13,000 Post Office engineers undertook a vital role in the war effort. However despite the creation of the ‘Home Depot’ in Regents Park, handling 12 million letters and 1 million parcels per week it is staggering to realise that 19 million items of wartime mail were nevertheless lost due to the sinking of ships. At least through the endeavours of GPO staff, 128,500 parcels made their way to Prisoners of War.

Commemorative Collectibles

As illustrated by our Great War presentation pack and commemorative coin marking World War One, this is a poignant moment to remember the millions of men and women who defended their country as Britain entered the First World War.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on Google+Email this to someone


About the Author

patrick.maddison@vowretail.com'



Comments are closed.

Back to Top ↑
www.PostOfficeShop.co.uk - Free Delivery on all orders over £30 ex. VAT